Tag Archives: plants

#hopejahrensurecanwrite

I discovered Hope Jahren and her writing via Twitter a few years ago, before she even had a blog. Instantly hooked, I added my voice to the rising chorus of #hopejahrensurecanwrite urging her to start a blog so we could get more from her virtual pen. I am constantly blown away by the astonishingly precise emotional power of her writing.

As you may have heard or read, Hope Jahren has a new book out, one that had even the notoriously hard to please Michiko Kakutani gushing praise at the New York Times, comparing the precise poetry and scientific imagination in her writing to that of the late great Oliver Sacks and Stephen Jay Gould! Other reviews of “Lab Girl” are unanimous in saying that Jahren’s writing will change the way you look at plants and at the world of science and nature.

My own amazement at plant lives, shaped in some part by Hope Jahren, has been exploding in recent years, as I read more about the astonishing things we continue to discover about their far from dull lives. Just this past week, I found myself urging my Intro Biology students out of their post-lunch lethargy by telling them to contemplate the life of a plant. Boring… they responded, before I started telling them about some of the incredible things plants do. Luckily, I had this passage from Lab Girl to read to them:

“It might strike you as fantastic, but you really can hear plants growing in the Midwest. At its peak, sweet corn grows a whole inch every single day and as the layers of husk shift slightly to accommodate this expansion, you can hear it as a low continuous rustle if you stand inside the rows of cornfield on a perfectly still August day.”

And today, when we start the unit on Fungi, I expect to share this gem of an observation:

“You may think a mushroom is a fungus. This is exactly like believing that a penis is a man.”

Somehow I was one of the lucky ones to receive an advance reader’s copy of Lab Girl, and have been meaning to write a review here. But this post ain’t it. Fan as I am of Hope Jahren’s writing, her book landed in my mailbox smack in the middle of the semester in an exceptionally busy and stressful year. I’ve started the book, but haven’t finished it yet, for… reasons…

I get the feeling that I may have pulled back from Hope Jahren’s book just a bit mainly as a perhaps misguided attempt to protect my time for things I must get done. And I don’t mean that Lab Girl isn’t something I must read – in fact I feel quite the opposite, that this book is more important than anything else right now, and therefore is something I must finish before anything else; and paradoxically, given the urgencies of other things, I’m forced to delay the gratification of immersing myself in this fantastic book because I have chores to finish. Why must one deny oneself such simple pleasures as reading a richly complex thing? Poorly structured procrastination? Lame excuse, I know, but I will allow myself to be swept away by Lab Girl very soon…

Meanwhile, my teenaged daughter S has swooped in and is devouring the book, savoring it slowly and reading particularly well-turned phrases and passages out loud to me from time to time. A budding writer herself, S delights in being swept away by Hope Jahren’s tales. After telling me more about it this weekend, and asking me how I could keep from finishing reading this book, S asked me to reread another thing which is her favorite from Jahren’s amazing blog: her open love letter to millennial women, which contains such passages as this:

“I finally understand why my mother was so adamant that I should not pierce my ears. Us old ladies have been disappointed to find that we are not so different from our male masters after all, when fear rotted our love into control. Your freedom terrifies us. In our day, if you admitted to being a lesbian, men tried to rape it out of you. For us, forty years of financial safety pragmatically trumped romance, and rendered purity before marriage one of many survival techniques. I struggle and hold my tongue, knowing deep down that you know best how to live in the world that you are creating. When you have time and pity, you are teaching me. You are better with people than I’ve ever been, naturally friendly and sweet.”

And this:

“Watching you from a distance, I like to think that you were born of the pain of my generation, of our punitive divorces and meager unfair paychecks and deadly IUDs. You are the precious daughters of the Revolution that we wanted, and of the broken-parts-missing Revolution that we got. When I am old and sick and ugly it will comfort me to know that you are the ones running the world.”

Indeed. Go read the whole love letter. Now. And then read the rest of her blog and bookmark it and add it to your RSS feed or whatever other device you have for keeping up with blogs. And buy and read her book “Lab Girl“.

Because you know what?

#hopejahrensurecanwrite

More birds and plants in the world’s cities than expected – a new paper from my NCEAS team

Tea with sparrows

A special present to celebrate this Darwin Day: the publication of the first paper from my global collaboration to study patterns and processes in biodiversity among the world’s cities. This first fruit of a collaboration that started 3 years ago under the aegis of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) in Santa Barbara has just been published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B:

M. F. J. Aronson, F. A. La Sorte, C. H. Nilon, M. Katti, M. A. Goddard, C. A. Lepczyk, P. S. Warren, N. S. G. Williams, S. Cilliers, B. Clarkson, C. Dobbs, R. Dolan, M. Hedblom, S. Klotz, J. L. Kooijmans, I. Kuhn, I. MacGregor-Fors, M. McDonnell, U. Mortberg, P. Pysek, S. Siebert, J. Sushinsky, P. Werner, and M. Winter 

A global analysis of the impacts of urbanization on bird and plant diversity reveals key anthropogenic drivers

Proc R Soc B 2014 281: 20133330-20133330 doi: 10.1098/rspb.2013.3330

The paper has 24 co-authors, from 10 countries, and involved a number of other collaborators who contributed data in some way. It is easily the biggest scale project I’ve ever been involved with, and one that promises to be very productive over the next few years. We started in 2011 by building perhaps the largest database of bird and plant diversity in cities, with 147 cities analyzed in this paper, and have continued to work on analyzing the data and expanding the database. This paper is the first in what we plan to be a series of articles analyzing the distribution of bird and plant species in urban areas worldwide to develop a deeper understanding of how cities interact with biodiversity. As such, this overview article has been a big first step in getting our work through peer review and into publication so the rest of the world—you—can read and see what we have discovered.

It is gratifying to see that there is broad interest in our results. The BBC News posted a report covering our paper even before the paper was available online, and the BBC World Service will shortly be interviewing Mark Goddard, one of the coauthors. Meanwhile, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s program The World Today spoke to coauthor Nick Williams earlier today, and you can hear his interview online in the show’s podcast. US media hasn’t quite woken up yet, so let’s see how much interest there is on these shores.

I will be writing more about this research, and explaining our findings in greater detail in a blog post or two over the coming few days (as and when I find time to finish writing the posts in between classes and committee meetings). For now, let me share this press release I helped put together for NCEAS:

——————————————————–

Julie Cohen
(805) 893-7220
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
Pat Leonard
(607) 254-2137
pel27@cornell.edu

February 12, 2014

Cities Support More Native Biodiversity Than Previously Thought
Researchers at UCSB’s NCEAS compile the largest global dataset of urban birds and plants, which shows world’s cities retain a unique natural palette.

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) — The rapid conversion of natural lands to cement-dominated urban centers is causing great losses in biodiversity. Yet, according to a new study involving 147 cities worldwide, surprisingly high numbers of plant and animal species persist and even flourish in urban environments — to the tune of hundreds of bird species and thousands of plant species in a single city.

Contrary to conventional wisdom that cities are a wasteland for biodiversity, the study found that while a few species — such as pigeons and annual meadow grass — are shared across cities, overall the mix of species in cities reflects the unique biotic heritage of their geographic location. The findings of the study conducted by a working group at UC Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and funded by the National Science Foundation were published today in the Proceedings B, a journal of the Royal Society of Biological Sciences.

“While urbanization has caused cities to lose large numbers of plants and animals, the good news is that cities still retain endemic native species, which opens the door for new policies on regional and global biodiversity conservation,” said lead author and NCEAS working group member Myla F. J. Aronson, a research scientist in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

The study highlights the value of green space in cities, which have become important refuges for native species and migrating wildlife. This phenomenon has been named the Central Park Effect because of the surprisingly large number of species found in New York’s Central Park, a relatively small island of green within a metropolis.

Unlike previous urban biodiversity research, this study looks beyond the local impacts of urbanization and considers overall impacts on global biodiversity. The research team created the largest global dataset to date of two diverse taxa in cities: birds (54 cities) and plants (110 cities).

Findings show that many plant and animal species, including threatened and endangered species, can flourish in cities, even as others decline or disappear entirely. Cities with more natural habitats support more bird and plant species and experience less loss in species as the city grows. Overall, cities supported far fewer species (about 92 percent less for birds and 75 percent less for native plants) than expected for similar areas of undeveloped land.

“We do pay a steep price in biodiversity as urbanization expands,” said coauthor Frank La Sorte, a research associate at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. “But even though areas that have been urbanized have far fewer species, we found that those areas retain a unique regional flavor. That uniqueness is something that people can take pride in retaining and rebuilding.”

Conserving green spaces, restoring native plant species and adding biodiversity-friendly habitats within urban landscapes could, in turn, support more bird and plant species. “It is true that cities have already lost a substantial proportion of their region’s biodiversity,” said Madhusudan Katti, a faculty member in the Department of Biology at California State University, Fresno. “This can be a cup half-full or half-empty scenario. If we act now and rethink the design of our urban landscapes, cities can play a major role in conserving the remaining native plant and animal species and help bring back more of them.”

The human experience is increasingly defined within an urban context, the authors noted. They maintain it is still possible for a connection to the natural world to persist in an urban setting, but it will require planning, conservation and education.

“Given that the majority of people now live in cities, this group’s synthesis of data on plant and urban plant and animal diversity should be of broad interest to ecologists as well as urban and landscape planners,” said Frank Davis, NCEAS director.

# # #

Note to editors: Frank Davis is available at frank.davis@nceas.ucsb.edu or at (805) 892-2502. Downloadable images are available at http://www.news.ucsb.edu/node/013947/cities-support-more-native-biodiversity-previously-thought.

——————————————————–

Of course, feel free to also contact me if you have questions about the paper or our ongoing research into global urban biodiversity patterns, and if you need a reprint pdf of the paper. I would love to hear your thoughts on this work.

Urban gardens

 

Mirchi – scenes of a harvest picante from an urban organic farm

http://www.flickr.com/apps/slideshow/show.swf?v=71649

Warm sun in the backyard

on a mid November morning.

White-crowned sparrows n

Ruby-crowned Kinglets,

in the trees fluttering,

singing, proclaiming their

winter kingdoms, fleeting.

As I harvest the last of the chilies,

summer heat trapped within

their green/orange/red skin,

from green-thumbed Kaberi’s

organic farm, miraculous

in our patch of suburbia.

And listen to the good doctor

cast on the pod, talking films.

(Hello, Jason Isaacs!)

Perfect Saturday!

Except my women are half a world away…

Comparative ecology of cities: What makes an urban biota “urban”? | NCEAS

Just got word that the Featured Research page for our newly funded working group is up on the NCEAS website now! Have a look (at the above link, or the excerpt below the fold) – let me know what you think, or if you have any relevant ideas / suggestions to share. And come back to read more as we tackle this big question.

Continue reading