Monthly Archives: November 2012

Eurasian Jay Taxidermy

A gorgeous mount of an albino Eurasian Jay (Garrulus glandarius) next to a normal one.  Clever mount!  (Done by William Hales Taxidermy.)

Go home, crow. You are drunk.

I couldn’t help but make this.  Photo by Stefan Wöhrmann via fotocommunity.

Steller’s Jay Stealing Sweetner Packets

Human Interaction – Honorable Mention, Steller’s Jay Stealing Sweetner Packets (by SFBBO Click Off Photo Contest)

“Photo by Bill Stone. After a morning and afternoon of photographing fall colors south of Lake Tahoe my daughter and I stopped for a late lunch at Sorenson’s Resort. We had watched this Jay flying around the outside tables and when the people next to us left he helped himself to the sweetener packets. He stashed them around the resort and came back for more.”

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When I was wee and lived in California I had one of these plucky little jays steal a cookie right out of my hand at Yosemite.  Definitely one of my favorite jays and I loved watching them when we’d visit Lake Tahoe.  To this day if I hear the call of one in a movie or on the internet I smell Lake Tahoe.  Glad to know the Tahoe jays are still as fearless as ever!

Cognition

(via The Innovative Cockatoo: Figaro Invents, Makes, and Uses a Tool – ScienceNOW)

Not a corvid, but this article is an important lesson about animal cognition.  I’m interested in what animals are capable of in captivity when their basic needs are met and they have time to spend on thinking and other tasks that aren’t completely related to survival.

Food for thought!!

Black-billed Magpie

I love magpies.  They are such great little corvids and one thing I feel is under-appreciated is the amount of iridescence found in their wing and tail feathers.  I think they are truly one of the prettiest birds C:

Crows wander from family unit when temperatures drop

Part of the ‘Poughkeepsie roost’ photographed from Rinaldi Boulevard in the City of the Poughkeepsie. Crows roost in communal groups in cities for a variety of reasons, including safety in numbers and the fact cities are warmer. / Darryl Bautista/Poughkeepsie Journal file


 This is an article written by Dr. Doug Robinson, a member of the Crow Research Group.